We think these successive career waves can provide greater opportunities for employees to achieve ikigai

Quote from The Technology Fallacy (Management on the Cutting Edge):

This need to continually pivot to the next possible career wave also has another implication—the need and/or the ability for employees to chart their own course of career exploration with passion. By passion, we don’t necessarily mean an overriding and long-term desire for a specific goal. Instead, we envision it as the opportunity to scan the environment and find the point at which personal interest and market opportunity are maximized. The American writer Frederick Buechner describes this as one’s calling, where the world’s deep need and the individual’s deep joy meet. The World Economic Forum describes this intersection in terms of the Japanese concept of ikigai—the junction at which what you love, what you are good at, what you can be paid for, and what the world needs all come together. We think these successive career waves can provide greater opportunities for employees to achieve ikigai, pursuing new avenues as their passions change and the disrupted world creates new opportunities to do so.

Quote from A Practitioner’s Guide to Account-Based Marketing

Quote from A Practitioner’s Guide to Account-Based Marketing

ABM makes such a measurable difference because it is designed with specific objectives aimed at a tightly targeted audience. Externally, it is an integrated, coordinated programme of activities that brings valuable propositions and relevant ideas to clients. Internally, it encourages closer cooperation between marketing, account management, sales and delivery teams because it is only truly effective when everyone involved with a client works collaboratively.

A key account plan, at its best, operates like a business plan, including objectives, sales targets, positioning, delivery and dependencies. But what it often lacks is a specific marketing element.

ProR development continues (Eclipse OpenSource RE tool based on RMF/ReqIF) – feedback wanted!

I am project lead on the Eclipse Requirements Modeling Framework (RMF), which also contains a tool called ProR for requirements engineering (http://eclipse.org/rmf). In two weeks, we’ll start a sprint to improve the GUI. We welcome feedback, so that we can prioritize properly before starting the sprint. More details can be found here:
http://www.formalmind.com/en/blog/next-pror-snapshot-coming-soon-please-help-us-prioritize
We appreciate any feedback!
BTW: You can subscribe to our newsletter to receive regular updates regarding ProR and RMF.
http://www.formalmind.com/de/blog

Dijkstra – The Three Golden Rules for Successful Scientific Research

For personal reference posted here:

“Raise your quality standards as high as you can live with, avoid wasting your time on routine problems, and always try to work as closely as possible at the boundary of your abilities. Do this, because it is the only way of discovering how that boundary should be moved forward.”

“We all like our work to be socially relevant and scientifically sound. If we can find a topic satisfying both desires, we are lucky; if the two targets are in conflict with each other, let the requirement of scientific soundness prevail.”

“Never tackle a problem of which you can be pretty sure that (now or in the near future) it will be tackled by others who are, in relation to that problem, at least as competent and well-equipped as you.”

Source: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~EWD/transcriptions/EWD06xx/EWD637.html