We think these successive career waves can provide greater opportunities for employees to achieve ikigai

Quote from The Technology Fallacy (Management on the Cutting Edge):

This need to continually pivot to the next possible career wave also has another implication—the need and/or the ability for employees to chart their own course of career exploration with passion. By passion, we don’t necessarily mean an overriding and long-term desire for a specific goal. Instead, we envision it as the opportunity to scan the environment and find the point at which personal interest and market opportunity are maximized. The American writer Frederick Buechner describes this as one’s calling, where the world’s deep need and the individual’s deep joy meet. The World Economic Forum describes this intersection in terms of the Japanese concept of ikigai—the junction at which what you love, what you are good at, what you can be paid for, and what the world needs all come together. We think these successive career waves can provide greater opportunities for employees to achieve ikigai, pursuing new avenues as their passions change and the disrupted world creates new opportunities to do so.

FDP, Rest In Peace

Really? New colors for the FDP (liberal party of Germany)? It’s sad, it used to be a party for entrepreneurs and "Mittelstand". But it had become a party for nepotism, and in the end it was simply a pawn for Mrs. Merkel.

This would have been the chance for it to reinvent itself.  For instance, by addressing structural issues for small businesses, like charging for the first call to order (Abmahnung) which is unique worldwide and hampers innovation.  Or highway robbery schemes like mandatory memberships (e.g. IHK) and GEZ (television-fee), which businesses have to pay as well.

But the FDP considers a new color more important, and prefers to discuss the Burka than Business. Sad.

Auctionata – cracking the fine art online auction market

Very cool interview with Alexander Zacke: "People are coming from all over the world to these auctions. They will register and then 30 minutes later, buy a piece for $100,000 and send the money the following morning." Wow.

The interview is quite insightful – in particular, how this team failed once big time, before managing to crack this market.  A market that Ebay (and others) unsuccessfully tried to develop.